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Intimate Instrumental Bach

November 16 @ 7:30 pm - 9:30 pm

| $30

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Intimate Instrumental Bach

Mark Kroll, harpsichord
Carol Lieberman, violin
Adelaide Boedecker, soprano
Thea Lobo, mezzo-soprano

Thursday, November 16 – 7:30 p.m.
Church of the Redeemer

Program includes:
Sonata for Violin and Harpsichord in C minor, BWV 1017

Wir mussen durch viel Trubsal, BWV 146
Ich will nach dem Himmel zu

Magnificat, BW 243
Deposuit potentes

French Suite for Harpsichord in B minor, BWV 81

Erfreut euch, ihr Herzen, BWV 66
Ich furchte zwar/nicht des Grabes Finsternissen

Sonata for Violin and Harpsichord in A major, BWV 1015

 

An array of violin and harpsichord selections including Sonatas in A Major and C minor, French Suite for Harpsichord in B minor, arias featuring Thea Lobo, and Blake Friedman.

Mark Kroll’s distinguished career as a performer, scholar and educator spans a period of more than 50 years. He has appeared in concert worldwide as a harpsichordist and fortepianist, and made numerous recordings of repertoire from the 17th to 21st centuries. As a scholar, Mr. Kroll has published Ignaz Moscheles and the Changing World of Musical Europe; Johann Nepomuk Hummel: A Musician and His World; Playing the Harpsichord Expressively; and The Beethoven Violin Sonatas. Mr. Kroll gives master classes and teaches throughout the United States, Europe, the Middle East and Asia. He was professor of harpsichord and chair of the department of historical performance at Boston University for 25 years.

Carol Lieberman, recognized as one of America’s leading exponents of Baroque violin performance, is equally acclaimed for her command of the violin repertoire from the 19th to the 21st centuries. Ms. Lieberman has concertized throughout North and South America, Europe, and the Middle East, served as concertmistress for the Handel and Haydn Society, Masterworks Chorale and Associazione Musicale Romana, and performed under the batons of Zubin Mehta, James Levine, Leonard Bernstein and Claudio Abbado. She was the first violinist to receive a DMA in violin from the Yale School of Music and her honors include a fellowship from the Mary Ingraham Bunting Institute of Radcliffe College and invitations to teach around the world. Ms. Lieberman has served as professor of music at the College of the Holy Cross since 1985, where she is also the director of the Holy Cross Chamber Players.

A native of Chicago, tenor Blake Friedman now makes his home in New York City where his recent appearance as Iago in LoftOpera’s production of Rossini’s Otello earned him critical praise for “his vast range and clear diction” (NY Observer), and for his “pliant tenor” (Parterre). The New York Times hailed him as the “most convincing tenor,” creating an Iago whose “voice has a plummy fullness and dusky hue,” and whose duet with Otello was “taut and exciting.” Other notable New York City performances include tenor soloist roles in the Liebeslieder Walzer with New York City Ballet at Lincoln Center and in Mozart’s Vespri Sollemnes de Confessore at Avery Fisher Hall (Geffen Hall). He also served as the resident tenor for American Opera Projects’ Composers & the Voice Symposium where multiple compositions were written specifically for his voice.  Mr. Friedman later prepared and premiered those new works at South Oxford Space in Brooklyn, the home of American Opera Projects, and at the National Opera Center.

Hailed as “excellent,” “impeccable,” “limpidly beautiful,” “impressive,” “stunning,” and “Boston’s best,” Grammy-nominated mezzo-soprano Thea Lobo has performed with the Boston Symphony Orchestra and has been a featured soloist with Handel and Haydn Society, Boston Baroque, Opera Boston, Northwest Bach Festival and New Vintage Baroque, among many others. A devotee of new music, art song, and early music, Ms. Lobo was a featured performer on True Concord’s Grammy-winning recording of Stephen Paulus’s Prayers & Remembrances.

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